Recipients announced for the 2020 Eastern Kansas Scholastic Art Awards

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The following students are recipients of the 2020 Eastern Kansas Scholastic Art Awards:

  • Senior Chloe Brown – Honorable Mention in Design
  • Senior Ashtyn Carns – Honorable Mention in Drawing & Illustration (2), Jewelry and Portfolio
  • Senior Annalise Chykta – Silver Key in Ceramics and Photography
  • Junior Rachel Harmon – Silver Key in Ceramics
  • Junior Jonathan Sterling – Honorable Mention in Ceramics (2)

 

 

Chykta entered the competition in 2019 and received Silver Key in Ceramics & Glass. She said the experience helped her prepare.

“Last year, my skills weren’t as sharp as they are now, but after getting a feel for how they judge, I knew I needed to put just as much effort, if not more, into each of my pieces,” she said.

While Chykta’s process and inspirations for her ceramics and photography pieces are different, she heavily considers the creation of both.

 

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  • Senior Annalise Chykta's ceramics piece received a Silver Key. It was titled "Who Runs the World?" "My work is largely inspired by nature, because when I was little, my spent almost all of our free time biking, fishing, or taking walks in the woods," Chykta said. "My process to make a ceramic piece either starts by watching Our Planet on Netflix, because of its beautiful cinematography, browsing on Pinterest, or by taking a walk all by myself, to be alone with my thoughts."

  • Senior Annalise Chykta's ceramics piece was inspired not only by nature, but also by her passion for bees. "For my bee vase, the name came rather easily, because I wrote an essay last semester about how bees, quite literally, keep the world alive," she said.

  • Senior Annalise Chykta's photo is titled "Moth Portrait". This work received a Silver Key. "I try not to name my photography anything too meaningful, because it's my job to take the photo, and the audience's job to observe it and deduce what the photograph means to them," she said. "For a photograph, most of the time, I never plan my shoots. I drive out into the middle of nowhere to find things and buildings that people almost never glance at, then shoot them at varying angles, to make the subject look interest. On the rare chance that I do plan my shoots, they usually end up going in a different direction than I originally planned, which makes it more of a challenge for me."

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